Compare Medicare Coverages

Medicare open enrollment for 2021 started on October 15 and goes until December 7, 2020. Now is the time to compare plans and enroll in coverage. Fill out the form below to get in touch with one of our team members who can help you choose the right plan.

If you are eligible for Medicare and ready to explore your options for 2021, the first step is understanding its four parts (A, B, C, and D), which represent different kinds of coverage. This allows you to choose which parts you want and avoid duplicating coverage from other insurance plans. How you choose to get your benefits and who you get them from can affect your out-of-pocket costs and quality of care.

Please fill out the form below to get details for all 2021 Medicare plans.

What is Medicare?

Medicare is a federal government health insurance program, designed to help you afford health care. It comes in Parts A, B, C, and D. Turning 65 is one way you can be eligible for Medicare. In some states, if you are under 65 and qualify, some Medicare plans may be available to you.

Medicare Parts A and B together are known as “Original Medicare”. Most people get it when they turn 65. Here’s a quick breakdown of what each part covers:

Medicare Part A (hospital insurance):

Part A covers inpatient hospital stays, hospice care, limited stays in a skilled nursing facility and some in-home care.

Part A does not cover all your costs. For example, you’ll still need to pay both a deductible and coinsurance for a hospital stay.

Medicare Part B (medical insurance/doctor visits):

Part B covers generally 80% of doctor visits and outpatient care, including preventive care, medical supplies, tests and X-rays. Part B is optional, but most people get it.

While Original Medicare (Parts A and B) covers some basics, like hospital stays and doctor visits, it doesn’t cover everything. You’ll want more coverage to help pay for services not included in Original Medicare or to add benefits like prescription drug coverage, dental, or hearing.

Medicare Advantage plans, sometimes called Part C, are a way to get all the benefits of Original Medicare's Part A (hospital) and Part B (medical) and often Part D (prescription drug benefits) in one plan with an affordable premium. All of the Medicare Advantage plans come with preventive care benefits and you can sometimes add benefits like dental, vision and hearing.

HMO: With a HMO plan, you choose a primary care physician (PCP) who you see for all your check-ups and regular exams. Your PCP also directs you to specialists when you need them. You'll save on doctor visits and pay premiums as low as $0.

PPO: Chosing a PPO plan, you pick a primary care physician (PCP) for check-ups but can choose any doctor or specialist in your network without a referral. You can also see doctors outside your network but services may cost more.

Part D is Medicare's prescription drug program offered through private insurers. Most Medicare customers choose to add this on to complete a Medicare Supplement insurance plan or offer additional savings to Original Medicare. Our Part D plans will save you money when filling your prescriptions.

Medicare Eligibility

Generally, Original Medicare (Parts A and B) is available for people who are age 65 or older or disabled. Understanding when to enroll can help you avoid gaps in benefits and late enrollment penalties. The date on which your Medicare benefits begin depends on when you sign up.

If you're over 65 and already collecting Social Security benefits, you’ll be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B (Original Medicare) and you'll receive a Medicare card in the mail.

If you're not yet collecting Social Security benefits, the best time to sign up for Original Medicare is during your Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) . Your IEP is the 3 months before your 65th birthday, your birthday month, and the 3 months after your birthday month.

What if I’m not collecting Social Security yet?

If you are close to turning 65 but are not getting Social Security or Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) benefits, you’ll need to sign up for Medicare. Contact the Social Security Administration three months before you turn 65. You have a limited time to apply for Medicare, or you could miss out on coverage. You can sign up for Social Security and Medicare at the same time at your local Social Security Office.

Your IEP is the best time to sign up for Original Medicare (Part A and Part B). If you miss your Initial Enrollment Period Initial Enrollment Period you may experience penalties, higher premiums, and may have to wait for a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) to enroll.

What if I'm still working when I turn 65?

If you plan to work past age 65 and are receiving health insurance coverage through your company, talk to your employer or union to find out how your coverage works with Medicare. Your employer can tell you if you need to sign up for Medicare Part A and/or B to avoid a late enrollment penalty later, or if you'll be able to sign up during Special Enrollment Period when your coverage ends.

What if I'm disabled?

If you're under 65 and disabled, you'll be automatically enrolled in Medicare Parts A and B after you get disability benefits from Social Security or certain disability benefits from the Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) for 24 months.

The best time to enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan or a Medicare Part D (prescription drug) plan is right after you enroll in Original Medicare (Parts A and B).This is during your Initial Enrollment Period (IEP) . Your IEP starts 3 months before your 65th birthday includes your birthday month, plus the 3 months after your birthday month. Or you could enroll later when you retire.

If you miss your IEP, you can still enroll in a Medicare Advantage plan or a Medicare Part D (prescription drug) plan during the Annual Enrollment Period (AEP) , which runs each year from October 15 - December 7.

In some states, if you are under 65 and qualify, some Medicare Supplement insurance plans may be available to you. Turning 65 is also one way you can become eligible. When you turn 65, you have a 6-month window for a guaranteed right to enroll in a Medicare Supplement insurance plan. This enrollment period begins on the first day of the month in which you are 65 (or older) and enrolled in a Medicare Part B plan. You cannot be refused if you sign up during this open enrollment period.

Each year, you can add or change a Medicare Advantage or Medicare Part D (Prescription Drug) plan during the Annual Enrollment Period (AEP) , which lasts from October 15 - December 7. Sometimes you can also qualify for a Special Enrollment Period (SEP) .

For a Medicare Supplement insurance plan you can sign up for a plan at any time during the year. There are also a few guaranteed issue periods during the year.

Our Medicare Coverage Options

Our medicare experts can assist you selecting a plan that can help you pay for services that aren't covered by Original Medicare and add additional benefits like prescription drug, dental, or hearing benefits.

Medicare Advantage plans, sometimes called Part C, are a way to get all the benefits of Original Medicare's Part A (hospital) and Part B (medical) and often Part D (prescription drug benefits) in one plan with an affordable premium. Medicare Advantage plans come with preventive care benefits and you can sometimes add benefits like dental, vision and hearing.

HMO: With a HMO plan, you choose a primary care physician (PCP) who you see for all your check-ups and regular exams. Your PCP also directs you to specialists when you need them. You'll save on doctor visits and pay premiums as low as $0.

PPO: With a PPO plan, you pick a primary care physician (PCP) for check-ups but can choose any doctor or specialist in your network without a referral. You can also see doctors outside your network but services may cost more.

Part D is Medicare's prescription drug program offered through private insurance companies. Most Medicare customers choose to add this on to complete a Medicare Supplement insurance plan or offer additional savings to Original Medicare. Our Part D plans will save you money when filling your prescriptions.

Medicare Supplement insurance plans (also known as Medigap) help pay for things that Original Medicare doesn't cover - like your deductibles, copays and coinsurance. You can see any doctor that accepts Medicare patients without referral, and you'll have a monthly bill that's predictable and budget-friendly. You can even buy dental and vision insurance.

How It All Works

Our team of Medicare experts simplifies the decision-making process of choosing the correct plans in your area based on your budget and benefits needs.

Please fill out the form or call us now at (877) 935-6744 to speak to one of our experts.